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@maryhuynh is my m&m. ♥
"It's alright to do things the way you want. There is no map to life, no blueprints to survival; you can create your world day by day if you have a clear vision and an unwillingness to give up." John O'Callaghan

I also don't use this blog frequently. Just message if you're curious.


alphasandassociates:

deezyville:

officialalltimelow:

*whispers* Its almost hoodie season

Which means stick to well lit and highly populated areas at night if you’re Black.

image

kasieisdell:

1/3

anthrocentric:

somethingvain:

stuffhappening:

all autocompletes were screenshots of actual searches on 12/3/2013

photo credit: Mike Allen

This Photoshoot

The idea was inspired by the UN Women campaign by Memac Ogilvy & Mather Dubai. 

Racism from Absence

In my 19 years in America, I’ve never been stopped and frisked. Cops are always nice to me. People have no problems sitting next to me on the bus. No one’s scared of me no matter what direction I pointed my cap. 

The kind of Asian racism that makes headlines is cultural misappropriation -when some “insensitive” entertainer wears silk kimonos and painted faces to look exotic.

This never bothered me.

It’s the subtle, slippery racism that’s far more sinister. The absence of Asian leads in a non-martial arts movie or TV shows means I grew up knowing only non-Asian celebrities and role models. And if you’re an Asian guy, you are not the stuff of fantasies girls grew up dreaming about.

The absence of Asians from politics and upper management means that Asians can be hard workers and geniuses but never leaders.

Above all, there seems to be some perma-foreignness about Asians. It’s not unusual to be told to “go back to China” and to be mocked for an accent we don’t have. The manifestations of this viewpoint range from the seemingly harmless to the outright hostile. But the underlying message is the same. Asians are not real Americans.

Inspirational Racism

I vividly remember seeing this racism first-hand in a conversation with one of my former business partners. I wanted to create a mentoring program in a predominantly Asian school organization.

He flat out told me he had no interest in helping Asians succeed in America. I asked him, “Are you serious?” He said, “Yeah.” He laughed a little.

He was serious.

It was a wtf moment for many reasons and was a major factor behind my decision to leave my position as a co-founder. I eventually heard from a mutual friend that he said I was a follower not a leader.

In retrospect, I’m fortunate to have heard him verbalize something that others keep to themselves. It allowed me to move on to bigger and better things instead of wasting time working with someone who never saw me as a partner. 

This is the most important post I’ve seen in a while. Racism from absence is something that is predominant here on tumblr, which is shocking because this is the most politically correct and representative platform I have in my life. It’s not okay to joke about transgendered individuals, it’s not okay to joke about racism against black people, but apparently it is always okay to joke about Asians. Perhaps it’s because the internet is so US-centric, but the only POCs I’ve ever seen recognized or represented seem to be african-american/black, and calls for the end of institutionalized racism tend to ignore the equally long history of oppresion many Asian countries have suffered, and Asian immigrants in western countries continue to suffer. Ask yourself this: in a world where Asians make up the majority of the global population, have you ever seen Asian individuals valorized for anything other than being aberrations of the Asian culture? Wait- can you even name more than 10 Asian individuals valorized to the extent of mainstream popularity? 

As an Asian in an international school, I’ve seen this type of subtle racism enacted every single day. When I work hard to achieve something and the results reflect my hard work, the response I most typically hear is “it’s because you’re Asian.” To hear that the hours I put into trying to be the best individual I could possibly be, coming home at 9PM after gymnastics to do homework late into the night and sleeping at insanely late hours or trying to balance Junior Achievement with community service, were not enough to gain recognition as Jasmine Chia and not simply another faceless slant-eyed member of the Asian ethnicity makes me truly wonder what it takes for an Asian to be represented in this world. My experience is something familiar to any other Asian who has had contact with the Western world:

Here is what I sometimes suspect my face signifies to other Americans: an invisible person, barely distinguishable from a mass of faces that resemble it. A conspicuous person standing apart from the crowd and yet devoid of any individuality. An icon of so much that the culture pretends to honor but that it in fact patronizes and exploits. Not just people “who are good at math” and play the violin, but a mass of stifled, repressed, abused, conformist quasi-robots who simply do not matter, socially or culturally. (source)

Next time we ask for POC representation in media, don’t forget Asians. Next time we see a piece of Asian amazingness, whether it’s He Kexin on the beam or Doona Bae in Cloud Atlas, take the time to humanize them instead of thinking of them simply as representatives of the Chinese gymnastics industry or the rising Korean wave of actors. When an Asian person is genuinely good at music, recognize that they worked hard for it. When an Asian chess prodigy wins the world championship, learn their name and not just the country they come from. Don’t pretend to get angry on behalf of geishas at cultural appropriation if you don’t stand up for the fact that cultural appropriation is the only form of recognition we get in mainstream media. 

It’s up to you and me. As a fashion blog, I say post more Asian models, more Asian designers. This is not about fighting against some oppresive power, but fighting to make space in a silence that defines Asian existence. My existence. 

Let’s not forget that there’s also varying levels of racism associated to the Asian identity. The attitudes towards East Asians, South Asians, and Southeast Asians are remarkably different — even though their cultures have all intermingled at different parts throughout history. The stereotypes of “Asian-ness” are all exaggerations of East Asians, while most South Asians aren’t even considered Asian by non-Asians. As for Southeast Asians, there’s internalized racism involved along with a long going history between East and Southeast Asians that have created the same mentality that current Americans have towards the Latin@ population. Unlike the commenters above, I and many other Southeast Asians have been regularly referred to as “the Mexicans of Asia,” which is offensive in so many levels (along with other, more specific, derogatory terms), and sadly, that phrase was always said by fellow Asians.

There is a long history of oppression between groups in Asia that has lasted for centuries before Western civilization even considered exploring east. However, due to the constant, oppressive power of a Western world through globalization and colonialism, this internalized and externalized racism is not only exemplified, but horribly disfigured to accommodate Western ideals. The Asian community is HUGE and while half of the Asian community (cough, East Asians) is exonerated and experience the racism stated above, the experiences of South Asians and Southeast Asians are completely different. True, in past history, East Asians have been racially profiled and physically abused, but that has started to decrease. South Asians are constantly attacked and lumped together, their identities stripped to only “Indian,” forced to deal with the stereotypes and racism of that identity. Due to the recent arrival of Southeast Asians to America (and the circumstances in which they travelled) many Southeast Asians live in low income communities and within their own racial category, consistently have the highest poverty rates. It’s to the point where Southeast Asians are racially profiled by the police and police have entered homes without a warrant and assaulted families (I also experienced this firsthand along with many other people I know). Where more than half of Khmer, Laotian, and Vietnamese people drop out of high school. Or that Hmong people (an ethnic group) are treated so harshly not just by Western society, but even by other Asian groups and subgroups that in official government documents, they get their own category and are monitored and profiled. That there’s a HUGE difference in poverty levels just within Asian identities

So yes, it’s true that not all Asians are stopped and frisked by the police. Only those Asians with higher levels of melanin and don’t fit within the “Asian Stereotype.” 

The above commentators tiptoe around the “Model Minority Myth.” The Model Minority™ is only given to people who have reached acceptable levels of “Whiteness.” True, many East Asians are no longer as publicly abused or mistreated, but like they said, it’s all silent. The discrimination and racism happens in the backfolds of law, government, corporations, etc. As for those who were unfortunate enough to have slightly above accepted levels of melanin, the abuse is public and loud. And often times, internalized racism from those trying to reach the Model Minority™ will be sure to continue to add on to this inequality by distancing themselves (which is dumb on itself, because it makes you a perpetual foreigner and only perpetuates animosity within the Asian community). It’s even worse if you so happen to identify with the LGBTQ+ community

How the fuck are you going to just lump together 6th generation Chinese Americans, Indian immigrants, and Hmong war refugees? Their histories are so vastly different. Their backgrounds will be the determining factor on why they’re treated a certain way. There’s inequality among the Asian community. It has a lot to do with politics and cultural identities, but these lumping of of identities ends up erasing actual struggles and experiences of Asian subcategories. 

Asian Americans do experience racism. Asians do experience racism regardless of where they are in the world. The manifestations of racism and discrimination will vary depending on one’s ethnic heritage, but it is very much real. It is present because of our institutions and which only continues to uphold microaggressions within the Asian community.

scienceyoucanlove:

Dennis Dimick

National Geographic

Aquifers provide us freshwater that makes up for surface water lost from drought-depleted lakes, rivers, and reservoirs. We are drawing down these hidden, mostly nonrenewable groundwater supplies at unsustainable rates in the western United States and in several dry regions globally, threatening our future.

We are at our best when we can see a threat or challenge ahead. If flood waters are rising, an enemy is rushing at us, or a highway exit appears just ahead of a traffic jam, we see the looming crisis and respond.

We are not as adept when threats—or threatened resources—are invisible. Some of us have trouble realizing why invisible carbon emissions are changing the chemistry of the atmosphere and warming the planet. Because the surface of the sea is all we see, it’s difficult to understand that we already have taken most of the large fish from the ocean, diminishing a major source of food. Neither of these crises are visible—they are largely out of sight, out of mind—so it’s difficult to get excited and respond. Disappearing groundwater is another out-of-sight crisis.

Groundwater comes from aquifers—spongelike gravel and sand-filled underground reservoirs—and we see this water only when it flows from springs and wells. In the United States we rely on this hidden—and shrinking—water supply to meet half our needs, and as drought shrinks surface water in lakes, rivers, and reservoirs, we rely on groundwater from aquifers even more. Some shallow aquifers recharge from surface water, but deeper aquifers contain ancient water locked in the earth by changes in geology thousands or millions of years ago. These aquifers typically cannot recharge, and once this “fossil” water is gone, it is gone forever—potentially changing how and where we can live and grow food, among other things.

A severe drought in California—now approaching four years long—has depleted snowpacks, rivers, and lakes, and groundwater use has soared to make up the shortfall. A new report from Stanford Universitysays that nearly 60 percent of the state’s water needs are now met by groundwater, up from 40 percent in years when normal amounts of rain and snow fall.

Relying on groundwater to make up for shrinking surface water supplies comes at a rising price, and this hidden water found in California’s Central Valley aquifers is the focus of what amounts to a new gold rush. Well-drillers are working overtime, and as Brian Clark Howard reported here last week, farmers and homeowners short of water now must wait in line more than a year for their new wells.

In most years, aquifers recharge as rainfall and streamflow seep into unpaved ground. But during drought the water table—the depth at which water is found below the surface—drops as water is pumped from the ground faster than it can recharge. As Howard reported, Central Valley wells that used to strike water at 500 feet deep must now be drilled down 1,000 feet or more, at a cost of more than $300,000 for a single well. And as aquifers are depleted, the land also begins to subside, or sink.

Unlike those in other western states, Californians know little about their groundwater supply because well-drilling records are kept secret from public view, and there is no statewide policy limiting groundwater use. State legislators are contemplating a measure that would regulate and limit groundwater use, but even if it passes, compliance plans wouldn’t be required until 2020, and full restrictions wouldn’t kick in until 2040. California property owners now can pump as much water as they want from under the ground they own.

California’s Central Valley isn’t the only place in the U.S. where groundwater supplies are declining. Aquifers in the Colorado River Basin and the southern Great Plains also suffer severe depletion. Studies show that about half the groundwater depletion nationwide is from irrigation. Agriculture is the leading use of water in the U.S. and around the world, and globally irrigated farming takes more than 60 percent of the available freshwater.

read more from Nat Geo

photo one and two by PETER ESSICK

Photo three by GEORGE STEINMETZ

pedazititos:

0salt:

Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

This is an important message on how privilege really works.

it’s good to remember that we shouldn’t only define ourselves by our marginalized identities. for example I am cis, I am middle class, I am educated, I speak English, I am a documented citizen—remember all of those identities you possess that give you privilege.

Young POC

shereadsbooks:

Please educate yourself about the Black Panthers,  The Brown Berets, and Yellow Peril. Learn more than standardized state educational institutions will teach you. Open your mind.

J. Cole mourns Mike Brown Memorial in Ferguson

"Racism should never have happened and so you don’t get a cookie for reducing it."
Ten Things White People Can Do About Ferguson Besides Tweet

maghrabiyya:

onlyblackgirl:

For white people wanting to know what they can do to help.

This applies to all non-Black PoC too

J. Cole mourns Mike Brown Memorial in Ferguson

Yo! Stop! Y’all do this all the time! (x)